Tag Archives: creative economy

Keeping The Edge

As with any game in sports, it’s rare that a good offense wins without a good defense to back it up. Your finances are no different.

So how often should You analyze your “game” to determine any weaknesses and reposition resources as necessary? Once a month is the best practice, subject to the unexpected, a flag that could put Your income at risk and elevate expenses.

Having an “A” game in place is good, and having a plan “B” is also recommended for reasons noted above. Here are a few tactics on how to fortify Your game plan:

  • Are there other possible revenue streams You could implement
  • Ideally you already have and are using a budget, and make sure You include Owner Draws in the budget
  • Document all cash purchases to capture any deductible personal or business expenses
  • Save consistently for rainy day and/or the emergency funds
  • Be as debt free as possible, pay off credit cards regularly if possible
  • Rotating credit cards and paying them off affects credit scores in a positive way

Accountancy is all about the numbers, achieving offensive/defensive balance, and being able to quickly adjust to change.

MJB’s Bookkeeping Solutions will work the sidelines to assist You in creating a clearer economic path, so that You can spend your effort and time on what is important.  Call, Email, or Make an appointment for Your No Obligation Consultation Today.

Does Math Really Count?

Guest Blog by Barbara J. Waite, Your Chief Priority Officer – Projects, Your Way

How many of you have had that experience in high school where you were wondering, “Now how in the world will math be useful to me in real life?” Well it wasn’t until I was asked to tutor a high school student on the fundamentals of algebra did I develop a real appreciation for the language of numbers. The real cool thing about this language is that it ties all humanity together… math is a universal phenomenon whether it is represented by the dollar, euro, yen or peso. As I began to ponder over this implication, I could clearly see how math is so immersed in our daily routine that our life would be chaotic without it! Here are a few examples of what I mean:

  • MATH HELPS US BUILD THINGS: Creating something that will last and add value to our home requires creativity, the right set of tools, and a broad range of mathematics. Having the ability to do minor home improvements will save a lot of money and headache. Armed with math, we will also have the ability to check the work and project estimates, ensuring we’re getting the best value.
  • MATH HELPS US BECOME GREAT CHEFS: More math can be found in the kitchen than anywhere else in the house. After all, recipes are really just mathematical problems or self-contained step-by-step sets of processes to be performed.
  • MATH HELPS US MANAGE OUR TIME: With only 1,440 minutes in a day, we really need help in prioritizing what we need to accomplish and thankfully, with the help of math, we can! By assigning each task a number and the higher the number, the more priority it receives. This mathematical to-do list allows us to dedicate yourself to the most important and time-sensitive tasks first.

And most importantly,

  • MATH HELPS US MANAGE OUR FINANCES: Experts agree that without strong math skills, people tend to invest, save, or spend money based on their emotions. Someone who thoroughly grasps the concepts of exponential growth and compound interest will be more inclined to better manage their finances.

These are but a few ways in which math helps us to make better daily decisions… not only in our personal lives but also our business, where the accounting system is the heart of the operation and the state of its health can mean success or failure. Simply put, math is about solving problems and it plays such an integral part in our daily activities both personally and professionally, it’s no wonder why our high school math teachers were so intent on teaching us this very valuable language skill.

If math makes you squirm or you just want a second opinion, consider an external Bookkeeper/Accountant Doctor for your finances.

Your Art is Your Business: Making Time for the Business to Keep Making Art

There are three things that work against artists making a living from making and selling their work: the (seemingly) fickle nature of people’s taste, the fickleness of the market, and (sometimes) the artists themselves.

Movies and television have fed us that trope for years: the temperamental artisté who isn’t good at “real life.” The writer who won’t use a computer. The painter who hates cell phones. It’s not that there’s anything wrong with liking typewriters or hating cell phones. But if you are counting on being discovered, lauded for your eccentricities, and left alone to create while other people handle your money for you, you might be waiting a really long time.

If you’re not interested in making a living with your art, that’s one thing. You working a day job and you make the time to create. But if you want to make a living with your art, you can’t afford embrace that faux artistic temperament and ignore the practicalities of running a business.

If you’re going to make a business of making art, you need to be able to approach it, in part, as a business. It helps to start doing that from the very beginning. That means creating a workable business plan.

What you need to know about creating a business plan

The Mission and Vision Statements

Every business plan, and every business, begins with mission and vision statements. Naturally you know why you’re an artist. You understand the drive it requires. But there’s something about putting it down in writing, codifying and clarifying it so that as you move forward, they are more than words on a screen. They are the foundation of your future success.

Goals

Yes, you want to create art and sell it. That’s the larger goal. Establishing some benchmark goals, however, will help you plan the steps you need to take in order to make that a reality. Where do you want to be in three months? Six months? Nine months? A year? You want your goals to be ambitious, but they should also be reasonable. You want to be able to march forward, but you also want to make sure that your goals aren’t so abstract that you grind to a halt when you hit a stumbling block. (And you will.)

Identify your customer

No, it’s not about making art to satisfy a customer. It’s about focusing your marketing and social media strategies to create the best possible outcome. The thing about being an artist is that while it may sometimes feel like no one notices what you do, it’s important to remember that there is an audience – and a customer – for everything. The hard part is knowing how to focus your marketing so that you’re working smarter, not harder.

 

That’s really the entire trick to giving the business enough time so that you can keep making art. Work smarter, not harder. It means more than just being comfortable wearing multiple hats and working on multiple levels. It means that, on some level, you thrive on it.

Starting and running your own business is always a risk, regardless of the kind of business it is. Turning your art into your business is a unique kind of risk, though, because you’re risking more than just the very important tangibles of time and money. You are also risking that intangible part of you that drives your art and makes you who you are.  The bravery required to put your passion on the line is necessary. But you need to protect that passion as much as you can.

However, if you forged ahead without a business plan, that doesn’t mean you can’t sit down and write one out. There’s never a wrong time to sit down and rethink how you’re doing things, and creating a business plan is a good way to re-evaluate and reorganize your business so you can focus on your art. There’s plenty of information out there to help you, too. Remember, part of working smarter, not harder means making use of available resources. Check out the Small Business Administration (SBA) Small Business Development Center, and SCORE a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses in your state.

Last minute tax tips for small businesses

As the April 18th deadline for filing taxes looms on the horizon, you may be in the enviable position of having already filed your tax return. If you haven’t already filed, however, as a small business owner or entrepreneur you are probably working overtime to get it done. Depending on the kind and size of business you run, you might have a tax preparation professional do your taxes for you. But you may be just starting out and want to save the expense; if that’s the case – and even if it’s not – there are a few things to keep in mind.

1. Know what you owe

As a small business, you should probably be paying your taxes quarterly. These payments can be easy to forget, though, especially if you are a sole proprietor working in the creative economy or the gig economy.

If you did make your final quarterly payment on January 15th, make sure you take that into account when you file. Take the time to deduct any levies or account for any late fees and penalties the IRS may impose if you happened to miss a payment.

2. Accelerate or defer.

Many sole proprietors use cash basis accounting – which means they report income when payments are received. Depending on the kind of business you have, you might consider scheduling your billing so clients can pay early in the new year for work you completed late in the previous year.

The advantage to this is that you’re getting income early in the year.

However, if you had a successful year you could accelerate your deductible expenses. There are a few things you can do to help relieve your tax burden if you plan ahead, such as:

  1. making extra charitable donations,
  2. renewing professional journals and licenses before the year ends, or
  3. replacing old business equipment.

If you are in the position to, you might also consider

  1. prepaying your state income tax,
  2. selling an investment property at a loss, or
  3. selling securities at a loss.

If you’re a small business owner or entrepreneur, there’s nothing you can do about taxes. They are as much a part of your business as your customers or client base. The trick to making it all less odious, though, is to be proactive. Think ahead early in the year so the end of the year doesn’t hit you any harder than it needs to.

Cash or Accrual – What’s the Difference?

The Cash method is like a checkbook. You record the income when you receive it, and record the expense when you write the check. It is easy to maintain, and good way to start for new businesses figuring out where they are going. It does not include the Accounts Receivable or Accounts Payable so may misrepresent your true income and expenses. As your business becomes more complex, you may decide you need the detail of Accrual accounting.

The Accrual method records the income when the sale is made, whether you have been paid or not, and records the expense when incurred, even though it has not been paid. It is a more intricate system to learn, however, more accurately tracks your finances. Preferred by Accountants and CPA’s for management purposes.

If you have questions about which is best for you, Contact MJB’s Bookkeeping Solutions now.

Find hidden profits

  1. Review Balance Sheet and Income Statements (P &) at least quarterly if not more.
  2. Reconcile Bank accounts monthly.
  3. Bank at more than one financial institution to develop a relationship that may help you when you need a loan.
  4. Hire a Bookkeeper to help you part time so you can focus on growing your business.

MJB’s Bookkeeping Solutions assists businesses and individuals with their accounting needs. Services include but are not limited to installation, setting up chart of accounts, training, and troubleshooting problems. We understand the challenges of owning a business, and are ready to connect you to the answer for all your business questions.

Contact us at 805-764-1MJB or 502-309-9MJB,  follow us on Twitter and Like Us on Facebook.