Tag Archives: planning

Who’s Managing Who? Lassoing The Runaways

Sooo, how do you keep your finances organized? Shall I expect your reply to include a sour look and an attempt to change the subject real fast? Many would rather be stuck in a huge traffic jam or go sit in the dentist’s chair rather than think about organizing their finances. But the truth is, if your costs, both business and personal, are running amok… then perhaps you might be throwing money to the wild, or down the drain.

Have you ever been surprised by that pesky late fee, then again, and again in rapid succession? Have you ever complained to the credit card companies that you never received the bill, only to find months later it had fallen behind the desk?

The cost of disorganization is not only financial, it can waste time and take a toll on our mood (and the unknowing around us). Consider how much replacing lost tools, recreating lost files, or time putting out fires costs your business. And there’s more… consider the losses involved with forgetting to send invoices to customers, paying for overtime labor and dealing with employee turnover. Disorganization costs money and could lead to measurable losses in profitability. It is time to stop the stampede, break in and bridle!

The good news is that it only takes 5 simple steps to help lasso in your business costs. You probably already have heard of that nasty “B” word, budgeting?

  1. Figure out your monthly net income (if it fluctuates, take the previous 12 months divided by 12 for the estimated monthly)
  2. Figure your monthly fixed expenses (rent, utilities, lease, insurance etc.)
  3. Figure variable expenses – commodities that don’t have a fixed price tag each month (office supplies, groceries, repairs and maintenance, meals and entertainment etc.)
  4. Figure a monthly contingency or reserve expense for the unexpected (trust me the unexpected is inevitable)
  5. Review the budget versus actuals monthly and fine tune your numbers

Your budget is a very useful tool to help plan for near and far range, and be able to go the distance. You might think you lack the time to organize your expenses, however, a few hours of organization with a professional accountant/bookkeeper, could spur you on towards being knee deep in clover sooner than later.

Make today be the day for changing horses. Decide to run free and keep up with the finances monthly yourself, contract a professional to saddle up on a regular basis, and/or occassionally opt for a bookkeeping/accounting audit to know that you are on the right track. The important thing is to corral the dark days.

Run for the roses.  Unwrap your Daily Double by Contacting Us Here and sending a message.

Does Math Really Count?

Guest Blog by Barbara J. Waite, Your Chief Priority Officer – Projects, Your Way

How many of you have had that experience in high school where you were wondering, “Now how in the world will math be useful to me in real life?” Well it wasn’t until I was asked to tutor a high school student on the fundamentals of algebra did I develop a real appreciation for the language of numbers. The real cool thing about this language is that it ties all humanity together… math is a universal phenomenon whether it is represented by the dollar, euro, yen or peso. As I began to ponder over this implication, I could clearly see how math is so immersed in our daily routine that our life would be chaotic without it! Here are a few examples of what I mean:

  • MATH HELPS US BUILD THINGS: Creating something that will last and add value to our home requires creativity, the right set of tools, and a broad range of mathematics. Having the ability to do minor home improvements will save a lot of money and headache. Armed with math, we will also have the ability to check the work and project estimates, ensuring we’re getting the best value.
  • MATH HELPS US BECOME GREAT CHEFS: More math can be found in the kitchen than anywhere else in the house. After all, recipes are really just mathematical problems or self-contained step-by-step sets of processes to be performed.
  • MATH HELPS US MANAGE OUR TIME: With only 1,440 minutes in a day, we really need help in prioritizing what we need to accomplish and thankfully, with the help of math, we can! By assigning each task a number and the higher the number, the more priority it receives. This mathematical to-do list allows us to dedicate yourself to the most important and time-sensitive tasks first.

And most importantly,

  • MATH HELPS US MANAGE OUR FINANCES: Experts agree that without strong math skills, people tend to invest, save, or spend money based on their emotions. Someone who thoroughly grasps the concepts of exponential growth and compound interest will be more inclined to better manage their finances.

These are but a few ways in which math helps us to make better daily decisions… not only in our personal lives but also our business, where the accounting system is the heart of the operation and the state of its health can mean success or failure. Simply put, math is about solving problems and it plays such an integral part in our daily activities both personally and professionally, it’s no wonder why our high school math teachers were so intent on teaching us this very valuable language skill.

If math makes you squirm or you just want a second opinion, consider an external Bookkeeper/Accountant Doctor for your finances.

Declare your Independence – From being the “Everything to All” for Your Business

Consider an outside bookkeeper/accountant in the same way as you would a longtime friend, as a source of reliable information and advice, but in relation to your business finances, they have specialized experience and focus.

The business scope of an accountant does not end with tax preparation; they can and should be a business partner throughout the year bringing their knowledge and perspective into your industry to help improve your bottom line and navigate through an uncertain economy.

Here are many reasons why all entrepreneurs should work with an outside bookkeeper/accountant:

  1.  Focus on the reason why you started your business. Entrepreneurs are very passionate, so why get bogged down with tasks that do not help to achieve their passions? On the other hand, a bookkeeper/accountant is inspired to take on the heavy lifting of the tedious money details of your business.
  2. Achieve work/life balance. You might be asking “What is that?” Many business owners might ask. In spite of how new or well established a business is, owners across the board are struggling to find the right balance between work and life. And this goes back to point 1; performing functions that you are less enthusiastic about handling, which allows you to sell, market and grow during the day and take your child to soccer practice at night.
  3. Represent your business professionally. Your bookkeeper/accountant and you represent your company in the best possible way. Companies that use such an external resource report that the service is vital to their success. In a recent study conducted by accounting experts among U.S. business owners, 89% of respondents stated that this is an essential element of their success.
  4. An Outside Accountant can introduce a new perspective. Most times entrepreneurs are so buried in the daily operations of their business that they might not be able to see the complete picture. Relying on your bookkeeper/accountant in this way allows you to take a step back, look at the wider picture and thus a fresh perspective. Who knows, you may come up with the next big idea the world has been waiting to hear.

Continuing the Pursuit of Independence
Today, July 4th, many entrepreneurs will be going to the celebrations of fireworks and barbecue with their families to celebrate Independence Day. Others might sneak some pieces of work between the parties, but mostly three-quarters of them (72 percent) agree on one thing: having their own business gives them greater freedom and independence than to work for someone else, which makes each day independence for them.

Being a business owner is not an easy role. Once a challenge is successfully resolved another takes its place. In working with small independent business owners, I have learned that would not give it up. The desire for continued independence is as strong in them as in the early settlers who declared their intent by the Declaration of Independence.

Could your business survive without the assistance of an external professional? Perhaps, but the insight, guidance, and expertise shared could be just the catalyst for making your business thrive.  Pursue Your Independence with MJB’s Bookkeeping Solutions and receive the gifts of time, business accountability, perspective, with less stress.  Contact Us.

Wishing all my readers a Safe, and Happy 4th of July Independence Day Celebration.

Marbles and monkeys: tracking your hours and expenses

Even though Richard Florida’s 2004 brain child, “the creative class”,  has come under fire in the last few years, many cities trying to redefine themselves in the wake of an increasingly dominant technological economy have still spent considerable time and capital trying to accommodate young urban creatives – freelance writers, graphic designers, computer programmers, artists, and media workers, as well as people working in healthcare, business and finance, the legal sector, and education.  As a matter of fact, a 2010 report predicted 40% of American workers will be earning their living as part of the “gig economy” by 2020.

 The next few blog posts will be focusing on accounting issues and challenges that face entrepreneurs whose work falls under the category of “the creative class” in a “gig economy.”

So either you’ve been sucked in by allure of being your own boss or you’re unable to find a single, stable job in your chosen career field. Now here you are. You are part of the gig economy. You have several clients with rotating deadlines, or you have a slew of single-project clients.  You get to work from home. You get to work in your pajamas. Sometimes you can grab your laptop and go to your favorite coffee shop and work. You might even be able to work from the beach! You have more control over your schedule than your parents did. And it’s awesome being your own boss.

But unlike the days of The Organization Man, you also have to shoulder the responsibility for tracking your hours and being more aware of your expenses. Even though sources like Forbes Magazine and Investopedia praise the gig economy and the idea of a mobile creative class, you know there’s a large part of your job that isn’t creative even if it is mobile.

Depending on the client, you will charge for your time differently: by the hour, by the project, or even by the word if you are a copy editor/copy writer. There are a lot of marbles to keep track of when you work for yourself. Different hours worked on different projects on any given day. Different hourly rates for different clients. Record keeping is essential. If you’re good with spreadsheets, that’s helpful. If not, consider finding some accounting software, cloud accounting, or — if you have a large enough client base – find an accountant to take the guess work out.

Not only do you want to keep a precise record of your work hours so you can bill your clients correctly, you also want to keep track of any taxes you will be required to pay. Why? Because now you’re now your own boss, without anyone in human resources or payroll to arrange for deductions. You are responsible for making sure Uncle Sam gets his cut. With all the joys and challenges of being your own boss in the “gig economy,” you don’t want that big angry monkey on your back weighing down your success.

Help your accountant, help yourself: a few tips for home-based entrepreneurs

 

A 2013 article from Small Business Trends stated that 69% of entrepreneurs in the United States start their businesses at home. This makes perfect sense. Many new businesses are in part or entirely operated online. As people buy more and more goods and services online, there’s less need to take the expensive risk of investing in a brick and mortar business. Moreover, if you know what you’re doing, you can help yourself – and your accountant – come tax season.

Although it takes additional time and a few extra steps, you can really help yourself by understanding the upside of claiming a deduction.

First if all, you know need to know what you can and can’t deduct. It’s a good idea to check with the IRS regularly to see if these things change, but here are a few things you can deduct.

The cost of a home office

In order for this deduction to pass any potential audit, you need to make sure the space you call your home office is a separate space or separated and dedicated space in your home. It doesn’t have to be its own room, but it can’t be a multipurpose space, either. For example, many people use an empty additional bedroom as a home office. Others have a separate studio or redesigned barn they use for a home office. If you are using a corner of your basement, that’s fine, too. Your home office doesn’t have to have four walls and a door.

But you can’t set up computer desk in the corner of a guest bedroom or nursery and call it your home office. The key here is that it must be a regular and exclusive space you use to run your business.

You must also be able to show that your office is the principle place of your business. Even if you meet clients other places, you need to be able to show that you do the majority of your work in your home office.

Keep in mind that the IRS only allows up to 300 square feet. But they do allow for $5 for every square foot up to 300.

Technology and technology purposes

It’ll be a hard sell to convince anyone that if you have one computer that you are only using it for business purposes. If you do that, though, you can deduct the cost of depreciation.

If you decide to purchase a dedicated business computer, you can write the cost of it off. After that, you can write off the cost of depreciation. You can even deduct based on the percentage of use. TurboTax is very helpful with this.

You can also write off the cost of a dedicated phone, whether it’s a cell or landline.

It’s worth the hassle

When you’re starting a new business, whether you operate it out of your home or not, every penny counts. Staying on top of and taking advantage of tax laws can help turn a slow first year into a much better second year.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that keeping track of all your expenses, and keeping all of your business receipts will make it easier in your end of year accounting and tax preparation. You will save yourself and your accounant time, money, and headache down the road.