Tag Archives: time management

Marbles and monkeys: tracking your hours and expenses

Even though Richard Florida’s 2004 brain child, “the creative class”,  has come under fire in the last few years, many cities trying to redefine themselves in the wake of an increasingly dominant technological economy have still spent considerable time and capital trying to accommodate young urban creatives – freelance writers, graphic designers, computer programmers, artists, and media workers, as well as people working in healthcare, business and finance, the legal sector, and education.  As a matter of fact, a 2010 report predicted 40% of American workers will be earning their living as part of the “gig economy” by 2020.

 The next few blog posts will be focusing on accounting issues and challenges that face entrepreneurs whose work falls under the category of “the creative class” in a “gig economy.”

So either you’ve been sucked in by allure of being your own boss or you’re unable to find a single, stable job in your chosen career field. Now here you are. You are part of the gig economy. You have several clients with rotating deadlines, or you have a slew of single-project clients.  You get to work from home. You get to work in your pajamas. Sometimes you can grab your laptop and go to your favorite coffee shop and work. You might even be able to work from the beach! You have more control over your schedule than your parents did. And it’s awesome being your own boss.

But unlike the days of The Organization Man, you also have to shoulder the responsibility for tracking your hours and being more aware of your expenses. Even though sources like Forbes Magazine and Investopedia praise the gig economy and the idea of a mobile creative class, you know there’s a large part of your job that isn’t creative even if it is mobile.

Depending on the client, you will charge for your time differently: by the hour, by the project, or even by the word if you are a copy editor/copy writer. There are a lot of marbles to keep track of when you work for yourself. Different hours worked on different projects on any given day. Different hourly rates for different clients. Record keeping is essential. If you’re good with spreadsheets, that’s helpful. If not, consider finding some accounting software, cloud accounting, or — if you have a large enough client base – find an accountant to take the guess work out.

Not only do you want to keep a precise record of your work hours so you can bill your clients correctly, you also want to keep track of any taxes you will be required to pay. Why? Because now you’re now your own boss, without anyone in human resources or payroll to arrange for deductions. You are responsible for making sure Uncle Sam gets his cut. With all the joys and challenges of being your own boss in the “gig economy,” you don’t want that big angry monkey on your back weighing down your success.

GrinchtoGlee

From Grinch to Glee – Make year end easier with these bookkeeping tips

It’s not that your heart is two-sizes too small like the Grinch, but rather that your head might explode from all the year-end bookkeeping tasks on your list. While these to-dos could certainly put your holiday spirit in short supply, we know how and Who can help.

It’s essential that your data is accurate, complete and organized for tax time and the year ahead. But where do you begin?

Like the Whos in Whoville helped Grinch, we offer tips to keep you and your books on the nice list.

  • Evaluate your financial standing

Review profit and loss, your balance sheet and general ledger. Make sure they aren’t mangled up in tangled up knots by checking that all transactions have been recorded and posted to the proper income, expense, asset or liabiity accounts. Also check the accuracy of your accounts receivable and accounts payable, and write off uncollectible debt so as not to overstate your income (especially if accrual based), and overpay the You-Know-Whos.

  • Complete bank reconciliations

Make sure your checking, savings and credit card accounts have been reconciled. Loan interest should be separated from the principal and accurately logged. And a decidedly, non-grinchy trick: reconciling monthly makes it easier to catch errors.

  • Review Personal Expenses

You shouldn’t, wouldn’t, oughtn’t, mustn’t mix your personal and business expenses (although for the Sole Proprietor it’s often a necessity), so look at your expenses closely and if that’s the case find receipts and/or cancelled checks and log the expenses in your books. Then watch your heart grow because you avoided paying extra taxes.

  • Review Subcontractor Services

If you’ve hired any Whos who are Sole Proprietor’s or LLC’s, for contract services totaling more than $600 during the year, you’ll be required to send them a 1099 Misc form. It’s a best practice to send each new subcontractor or vendor a W9 at the time of hire to ensure you have complete address information and either their Social Security Number or Federal ID Number information on file.

  • Take Inventory

Review your inventory during the last month of the tax year and make necessary adjustments to align the inventory account of floofloovers and whowonkas to match the items in stock.  Your inventory value should show the cost price or price paid rather that the selling price for your items.

  • Create a Filing System

It may sound overly simple and antiquated, but we know an organized system for easily accessing the documents you need, when you need them come tax time will make you happy as a Who.

As you celebrate the close of 2016, it’s also time to look to the year ahead. If one of your goals is to have more flexibility and time to achieve your personal and business goals, consider the advantages of having a Bookkeeper. Not only an excellent resource to simplify your financials and ensure accuracy, a Bookkeeper can also be a personal advocate, a partner as loyal as Max, and someone to help you make your Holidays mean a little bit more for years to come.